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Meet the woman who wages a personal war on the supermarket

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Lynne Webster struggles to remember her second trip to the supermarket.

She knows she had one visit a few months ago because of rennet, but remembering the visit before that one proved difficult.

Then, proof: Her mom always gives her a New World coupon for Christmas, and while Webster had passed the last coupon on to a friend, she was sure she’d spent a coupon from 2020.

“So here you go, I’ve definitely passed over again at least in the past two years.”

Sharemilker Lyn Webster has been avoiding supermarkets for years.  After completing a personal challenge to live on a $1,000 annual grocery budget in 2018, the Northland woman has never looked back.

supplied

Sharemilker Lyn Webster has been avoiding supermarkets for years. After completing a personal challenge to live on a $1,000 annual grocery budget in 2018, the Northland woman has never looked back.

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Webster has avoided supermarkets for more than a decade, in a move first out of necessity and then out of habit.

It started when she realized she had become the recipient of big-box purchases in the aisles, mainly out of guilt for being a single mother whose children had to put up with the slack while she worked.

“They made their dinner themselves while I was trying to put a sick cow to its feet, so when they said ‘Can we have this or that? ” I said yes.”

Lynne Webster lived for a year on just $1,000 worth of grocery purchases from the supermarket in 2018.

Lynn Webster/Staff

Lynne Webster lived for a year on just $1,000 worth of grocery purchases from the supermarket in 2018.

When the global financial crisis hit, Shremelker took a long hard look at its spending and realized things had to change. Not only was she buying things the family didn’t need, but the amount of plastic packaging and food wasted was appalling.

“I was spending $300 a week shedding a lot of things and gaining quite a bit of fat because of my problem. I look at the way we used to live and I feel disgusted with myself.”

In 2009, the single mother began dating her attempts Reduce your purchase bill And she’s living a greener life in a newspaper column called Pig Tits and Parsley Sauce. The name came from what her mother would say when the kids pressed her about what was for dinner: “It was a way of saying ‘I have no idea, go away’.”

The self-described former supermarket addict set a weekly budget of $100 and then found it so easy she cut it down to $75, nearly three times her annual $12,000 savings goal. A book with the same name as her column was published in 2013, although the publishers changed the name to Save. Make. Do. to reprint it.

In 2018, milkshakes doubled their stock in their frugal ways with 1000 dollars Grocery budget for the year, inspired by the 63-day stay away from supermarkets in 2017.

It forced me to make bread, cheese and butter. Suddenly I realized he was able to do it and I never looked back.”

Webster created her own soap using colostrum from her cows after they had just given birth, as she was looking for ways to spend less than $1,000 on groceries during 2018.

Supplied / Waikato Times

Webster created her own soap using colostrum from her cows after they had just given birth, as she was looking for ways to spend less than $1,000 on groceries during 2018.

And she didn’t. after sharing successes A failure with thousands of Facebook Followers I beat the challenge and kept moving forward.

She estimates these days that she spends about $35 a week on things she can’t make, trade, or grow, but she rarely spends in the supermarket.

“What’s good there? Meat, milk, vegetables – you can get them somewhere else. I buy from Asian grocers and local butchers, places that support the little guy.”

She makes her own soap, uses milk from her cows, and buys ingredients in bulk online.

One of its recent victories has been the flatbread, something that can be made using just a few inexpensive ingredients.

Cleaning products have been replaced by good old baking powder which is also used as shampoo and body wash.

And of course you buy things like toilet paper, both online and in bulk.

“Supermarkets are robberies, these little six packs are designed so you’ll go back there and spend $50 while you’re at it.”

things

New Zealanders are tightening their belts as rising costs of groceries, petrol and housing create a severe storm.

Although Webster’s avoidance of the supermarket has been around for a long time, she’s noticed a sudden rise in others doing the same.

as in New Zealand cost of living It continues to rise, and so does the population of kiwis desperate for tips to help make ends meet. Her social media page and website It is becoming more popular than ever.

Despite this, Webster is reluctant to talk about her success. She knows she was privileged to have milk cows and that her neighbors “left dead ducks hanging on the mailbox.” But she mostly doesn’t want to seem arrogant.

While it changed its behavior during the global financial crisis, it believes the world is in worse shape now, and consumers should have seen that coming.

Making spices from dried onion herbs

Supplied / Waikato Times

Making spices from dried onion herbs

“If you start to keep going, it will piss people off because they know they should have done it before. It’s easier to do it when you choose to do it, rather than waiting until you have to.”

Webster doesn’t tell anyone else how to live, she just hopes to inspire people who, like her, have realized there is a better way to do things.

“You don’t go from being a supermarket addict overnight, it’s a gradual process and it’s all in your head.

“We should all be empowered, making things and striving for it. Do whatever you can to distance yourself from this place.”

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